DON  DE MAURO
Portrait/ Self PortraitFigures Contextualized Object and SubjectSTill LifeTime FramesCross Sectional AnatomiesPanelsCollageInstallationPaintingsAssemblageWorks on paper
The work on this site represents more than half a century of commitment to and engagement with the history, concepts and theories of “art” and the parallel creation of the work presented.

I was born at the cusp of a second world war on August 19, 1936, into a second generation Roman Catholic family that consisted of three brothers, our parents, and myself. It was a family under economic stress and consumed with serious health issues. This particular context of societal and familial breakdown fostered an existentialism that was consistent with and nurtured by my own evolving instinctual philosophical perspective.

This existential perspective, grounded by its opposition to all inherited forms of transcendence was consistent with and key to my own existential formation. Concepts of immanence, singularity, multiplicity and becoming, could and would ground my aesthetic and social choices. It interested me that "art" was a socially functional strategy for the existential impulse.

At this point it is necessary to acknowledge my commitment to the "figure" in my work. Art is language, and the body is the site of language. For myself, the body is by its existential nature nomadic and migrates to the figural. The term figural wants to acknowledge singularity, multiplicity, form, boundaries and becoming. Art is for myself equally anatomical and political, personal and social. The body is the site of conception and sensation. Art, and here I will include drawing, mediates and interprets through line, shape, plane, tone and color, the internal and external intensities of boundaries and their entanglements.

Finally, this site is determined by its inherent questions of presentation and representation of inclusion and exclusion. The dialectical tension of the questions raised imply the responsibility and choice necessary for aesthetic and social formation.

In the end these works—these things presented and represented—need to be made well enough and then nurtured, so that the work speaks for itself. Visual art wants to give physical matter its own sensate logic—a voice.